7 Best Ti Kuan Oolongs For Authentic Tea Drinking Experience

Last updated: August 24, 2020 at 0:25 am

What is Ti Kuan Yin oolong tea?

Ti Kuan Yin (Iron Goddess of Mercy) is a well-loved and very popular Chinese oolong with its origins in Anxi. Anxi is a famous tea producing region in China’s Fujian province, and Ti Kuan Yin oolong is its brightest star. The processing of the tea is very elaborate and involves about a dozen steps. In fact, there are different types of Ti Kuan Yin oolong that vary in flavor, depending on the level of roasting and oxidation.

How is Ti Kuan Yin made?

The production of Ti Kuan Yin follows the traditional artisan way from start to finish. The harvested tea leaves are dried to remove some moisture, after which they are rolled by hand. They are then allowed to oxidize slightly before being slowly roasted. The hand-rolling, oxidizing and roasting processes may be repeated multiple times, according to a particular recipe; the final result is a sublime oolong with a layered, complex flavor.

What is Ti Kuan Yin tea good for?

Sip a few cups of Ti Kuan Yin tea every day and you won’t just be treating yourself to unique fragrances and flavors. You’ll also be enjoying a wide range of health benefits. Packed with antioxidants, vitamin C and vitamin E, this oolong prevents excessive oxidation in the body and brings free radicals down to a minimum. As a result, it has excellent anti-ageing properties. Ti Kuan Yin tea has also been found to have excellent cancer-preventing effects, more so than other oolongs. Plus, with regular consumption of the tea, you can keep cardiovascular troubles at bay, maintain healthy cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and get to your target weight with relative ease.

Tasting notes and reviews

Ti Kuan Yin is a light to moderately oxidized tea with mellow, smooth, floral taste, often described as “orchid” or “peach”. Most tea drinkers find this flavor “surprisingly sweet and floral”, with some “light buttery notes”. One can detect a mix of “osmanthus, white flowers and evergreen” in its lingering aftertaste, one that is best savored by waiting a few minutes between infusions. Ti Kuan Yin oolong produces a light-colored, transparent, aromatic infusion that “turns vegetal” with further steeping.

Tea tips

Ti Kuan Yin, with its mellow, sweet taste and affordable price-point, is a perfect everyday oolong and a great tea for oolong beginners. Go for it if you want to try oolong and aren’t sure where to start. Some indicators of genuine Ti Kuan Yin:

tea leaves floating in tea cup

  • Tightly rolled tea leaves that take the shape of greenish-black semi-balls; the buds are covered with white tips.
  • Unfurling of the tiny tea balls when submerged in hot water, revealing a single bud with one or two leaves.
  • An infusion varying in color from light green to pale golden, to amber.
  • A mellow, sweet flavor with a “long” finish and lingering aftertaste.
  • Try other Chinese oolongs. Phoenix Dan Cong and Da Hong Pao from Wuyi Mountains are some of the most famous.
Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong Tea

Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong Tea

Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong tea has a light 'airy' character with lightly noted orchid-like hints.  This is an excellent tea to start your Oolong exploration, and begin to reap the health benefits of Oolongs.
Tie Kuan Yin Oolong Tea Organic

Tie Kuan Yin Oolong Tea Organic

Tie Kuan Yin Oolong Tea undergoes partial fermentation, producing a beautiful medley of black and green teas with lightly roasted curled leaves, and it has a full-bodied, smooth taste. Low in caffeine, one cup of oolong tea has 10-15% of the caffeine in a cup of coffee. A succulent tea sure to appeal to the senses of both the black and green tea lover.
Organic Iron Goddess of Mercy

Organic Iron Goddess of Mercy

Organic Iron Goddess of Mercy Oolong, TieguanYin, is the famous tea that legend tells us was cultivated by the compassionate farmer Wei in order to raise money to restore the aging temple that housed the iron statue of Guanyin in Fujian's Anxi county. We love Organic Iron Goddess for its magical, smooth taste with a very delicate sweet touch. This premium Oolong is amazing through 4 to 6 infusions.
Iron Goddess of Mercy Tea – Ti Kuan Yin

Iron Goddess of Mercy Tea – Ti Kuan Yin

A Chinese oolong tea that is storied to have grown on China's high hilltops amongst fresh streams and cool crisp air. Iron Goddess of Mercy is comprised of tender leaves that are gently basket tossed immediately after harvesting to rupture the cells for semi-oxidization. Trust us, you'll want to re-steep this.
Tie Guan Yin “Iron Goddess” Oolong Tea

Tie Guan Yin “Iron Goddess” Oolong Tea

Whenever Anxi County is mentioned, many people automatically think of Anxi Tie Guan Yin “Iron Goddess” tea, well-known both at home and abroad as one of the top 10 Chinese teas. This tea can withstand a great number of infusions, and will exude a lofty, elegant aroma the whole way through, resulting in a truly unique experience.
Nonpareil Handmade Anxi Qing Xiang TieGuanYin Oolong Tea

Nonpareil Handmade Anxi Qing Xiang TieGuanYin Oolong Tea

When Anxi County is mentioned, the most common association is Anxi Tie Guan Yin, “Iron Goddess” tea. It is well-known both at home and abroad as one of China’s ten greatest teas. As tieguanyin can endure through a great number of infusions, all the while letting out a lofty, floral aroma, this tea is truly unique to drink. The aroma washes away the noise and stress of the city and leaves in its place the brisk fragrance of orchids, a mellow taste from the first sip to the last, and then the tea’s characteristic sweet, throaty flavor and lingering aftertaste.
Fujian Ti Kuan Yin

Fujian Ti Kuan Yin

Ti Kuan Yin (also spelled Tieguanyin) is a legendary tea from the Fujian province and is one of China's most beloved oolongs. This loosely-rolled, lightly-oxidized (almost green) tea yields a pale-gold cup with soft, buttery texture and orchid notes that linger to reveal the leaves' complexity. As the liquor cools, it reveals a sweet finish of honeydew melons. We..

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